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Photo: Paulina Holmgren

How it works

Learn how staying at ICEHOTEL works, how to get here, tips and practical info.

 

How to book

  1. Find out your flight route and availability. The closest airport is Kiruna, which is served daily from Stockholm by SAS (Star Alliance) and Norwegian.
  2. Click ”book” and select package or rooms & activities.
  3. Check availability in the calendar. We recommend you stay first or final night cold, the remaining in a warm room. First select the date for a cold room, then start a new search for the nights in warm and add those to your basket.
  4. Confirm purchase or click “Activities” to add table reservations, transfers and excursions (we highly recommend you book these at least three weeks in advance).

Tip!

If your search returns no availability, try swapping the order of your combination of warm and cold nights. Also, if you don’t mind late booking, check back within 30 days of your preferred dates as there may be some rooms canceled or returned that are available to book.

December and February are busy months, it may be easier for you to find rooms in January, March and April.

Unfortunately you cannot book combined flights and room packages with us directly, but if you prefer this then we advise you contact one of our accredited partners.

Deluxe Suite, Rhythm of the Arctic. Design: Shingo Saito and Natsuki Saito. Photo Asaf Kliger.

How do we get there?

Icehotel is located 200 km north of the Arctic Circle, in Swedish Lapland.

The closest airport is Kiruna, which has daily connections from Stockholm (the flight takes about 90 minutes). From Kiruna Airport you can go by car, taxi or you can book the transfer through us.

You can also get to Icehotel by train from Narvik (Norway) or Luleå (Sweden), or by car.

How many nights should we stay?

One night in a cold room and a couple of nights in a warm room is ideal, as it gives you time to join wilderness excursions on the days when you have a warm room to return to in the evening.

If possible, we recommend you book your first or last night cool, the remaining nights in our warm cabins or hotel rooms, or join an overnight snowmobile excursion (only on select days).

Art Suite 7,5 Rø. Design: Wolfgang A. Luchow, Sebastian Scheller &  Anja Killan. Photo: Paulina Holmgren.

What to pack

Functional clothing is key for enjoying and being safe in the outdoors. Loan of warm outer clothing (snowsuit, boots, gloves and balaclava) is included when staying with us. In addition, you should pack thermal underwear (preferably wool), breathable layer clothing, plenty of socks (again, preferably wool, rather than cotton or synthetic), and a warm hat. For your night in Icehotel, we recommend you wear thermal underwear, warm socks and a hat, and perhaps bring an extra fleece jacket or similar. The key is to think layers that allow good ventilation of body heat, materials that breathe and avoiding perspiration. Opt for oil-based creams and skip the morning shower when you have a day planned outdoors.

Guide to how to dress in the cold

 

What is it like to sleep in ICEHOTEL?

The temperature inside the hotel hovers at a constant of -5 to -7 C. We provide you with expedition-style sleeping bags which are tested for extreme temperatures, so you’ll be fine with just thermals, hat, warm socks and a mid-layer jumper. You are given access to your room at 6 pm, but the heated service building is staffed and open 24 hours, this is where you store your belongings, collect your sleeping bag and use the bathroom, shower and sauna. There is a tutorial for guests sleeping cold every day.

Art Suite: Cairn Forest. Design: Annie Hanauer & Matt Chan. Photo: Asaf Kliger

Where do I keep my belongings?

When sleeping in one of the cold rooms you store your belongings in a locker or booth in the warm service building which is staffed 24 hours, located just meters from the hotel.

What should I do when I’m there?

Icehotel is carefully designed and handcrafted by artists from around the world so to make the most of your visit, make sure to attend one of the guided tours through the hotel and pick up a copy of the art catalogue to read upon all the details. We recommend that you book activities to get the most of your holiday. Dog sledding, skiing or snowmobiling in winter, or river rafting and cycling in summer, takes you into the vast uninhabited boreal forest. Fishing, midnight sun and northern lights safaris are amazing ways to experience the Arctic. Joining a class with one of our master ice sculptors is of course a must!

Ice sculpting. Photo: Asaf Kliger

Around and about ICEHOTEL

The hotel is located in the heart of the tiny village Jukkasjärvi, with about 900 residents. Besides the actual cold rooms, ice bar and church, Icehotel has a restaurant, cabins, hotel rooms and lounge – all housed in warm buildings within walking distance of each other. There are around fifty cold rooms and around seventy warm rooms. There is also the local homestead restaurant just ten minutes’ walk away. There is a local convenience store in the village, but no cash point.

Photo: Asaf Kliger

What time of the year should I come?

As of 2017, Icehotel will offer cold sleeping 365 days of the year, so timing is down to which season that appeals to you the most. Visiting during December through February is an Arctic winter adventure at its most intense, with extreme temperatures and short daylight hours. March, April and early May is Arctic spring with long and often sunny days, and mild temperatures ranging between -10 C (14 F) and 10 C (50 F). Our summer is short and mild, but with near constant daylight hours thanks to the midnight sun. The northern lights season and golden autumn starts in September, as days begin to get shorter.

A good tip is to go in January, March, or April, when the hotel tends to be less busy.

Important information

Icehotel is extraordinary, for better or worse. To ensure the experience meets your expectations, there are some things that are useful to know in advance:

  • Between 10 am and 6 pm, Icehotel is open to the public. Day visitors and guests have access to see all the rooms (except luxury suites) and join a guided tour. This means overnight guests get their rooms at 6 pm and wake-up call is around 7:30 am when staying cold. (Check-in and out for warm rooms is at 3 pm and 11 am).
  • All rooms except the luxury suites have curtain doors.
  • The beds in the cold rooms have a bedframe made of ice, slatted bed base with mattress, reindeer skins and one down pillow per person.
  • There are no bathrooms (except the luxury suites) or storage in the cold rooms. These facilities are housed in a heated service building next to the hotel, where you also keep your belongings during the cold night. The service desk is staffed 24 hours.
  • You get a locker or cubicle (if staying in a suite), where you can get changed and keep your belongings.
  • The changing rooms, sauna and showers are communal for women and men respectively.
  • There are no electric sockets to charge your phone inside the cold room, so be sure to charge your phone before going to bed.
  • If you’re changing between cold and warm accommodation, there are about 6-7 hours when you don’t have a room to withdraw to. We strongly recommend you to plan one or two excursions during this time as exploring nature and local culture is a substantial part of getting the full experience. Our lounge and shop are open from 10 am.
  • Ice is an organic material. We may carry out maintenance and repairs during open hours.
  • Icehotel is built in sections, which means that there is still building work going on for some time after we’re open for guests.

Art Suite: Elephant in the room. Design: AnnaSofia Mååg. Photo Asaf Kliger